The Islands Historical Society
P.O Box 67 Freeport, N.S B0V1B0
islandshistorical@cwswireless.ca
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Islands Museum
in Tiverton, more pictures here


Islands Archives
in Freeport, more pictures here
Mandate of Islands Historical Society: To preserve, protect and promote the social history of Long and Brier Islands.

History of Islands Historical Society: In 1984, members of Brier Island Historical Society met with members of the Tiverton Board of Trade to found Islands Historical Society and build Islands Museum on Long Island.
In 2003, archival materials were moved to Freeport, where they could be held in a climate controlled atmosphere. Islands Archives is available to the public on a year round basis.

Memberships and Projects:
We are a member of the following groups: Association of Nova Scotia Museums (ANSM), Council of Nova Scotia Archives (CNSA), Canadian Heritage Information Network (CHIN), and the Nova Scotia Lighthouse Preservation Society. Islands Museum is a participating museum within the Province of Nova Scotia’s Community Museums Assistance Program (CMAP), and our practices are evaluated on a regular basis. We have also partnered with the Freeport Village Commission to showcase and care for “The Warner House”, located at Overcove Road, Freeport as well as Bay of Fundy Discovery Centre, supplying historical photographs for their interpretative panels.
Visit CHIN’s Virtual Museum’s site and access our on line exhibit “Survival of a People: Using Our Natural Resources 1875-1975”.

Museum Location:
3083 Highway 217, Tiverton, N.S. approximately 1.5 km from the Tiverton ferry wharf

Archives Location:
247 Highway 217, Freeport, N.S. located in the Freeport Community Development Centre.

Contact Information:(For full contact info click here)
Regular Mail:
Islands Historical Society,
P.O. Box 67,
Freeport, N.S.
B0V 1B0

E-mail:
islandshistorical@cwswireless.ca

Islands Museum Telephone Number: 902 839-2034
For Archives Appointments in off season: 902 839-2068

Area History:
Initially discovered by Champlain in 1604, Long and Brier Islands were a frequent stopping point and fishing grounds for the Mi’kmaq Indians in their travels between Maine and Nova Scotia. Evidence of shell middens and native tools dating back over 250 years has been found throughout the islands. Initial Brier Island settlers were fishermen from the New England States who came here to access the rich fishing grounds. In 1783 a wave of Loyalists, refugees from the War of Independence in the newly formed United States, set down roots on these rocky shores and founded the villages of Petite Passage (now Tiverton), Central Grove and Freeport on Long Island.